Coffee.

Colombia
Decaf

Region:
Risaralda
Varietal:
Various
Process:
Sugarcane Process
Tastes:
Green Apple, Toffee, Milk Chocolate
Roast Profile:
Filter

We have been working with Raw Material's Colombian projects for a few years now and each year the crop and production gets better and better. This project is close to our hearts; having been out to meet the producers and to have seen the incredible change in the lives of those who are involved.

The Red Association in this region began with the creation of a drying hub, where producers from the local area could dry their harvest without the risk of rainfall rinsing away their profits.

Sugar cane decaffeination is often termed as a natural process decaf. Ethyl Acetate is an organically existing compound (C4H8O2) and by-product found most commonly in the fermentation of fruits, and is present in both ripe bananas and beer for example.

The plant we work with in Colombia uses water from the Navado del Ruis (a volcano between Caldas and Tolima) and natural ethyl acetate from fermented sugarcane sourced in the southern region of Palmira, Colombia. This process begins with steaming of the coffee, increasing its porosity, beginning the hydrolysis of caffeine, which is usually bonded to salts and chlorogenic acid in the bean.

The beans are then submerged in an ethyl acetate solvent, until 97% of the caffeine is removed. A final steam is then used to lift residual traces of the compound. The ultimate residue which remains is ≥ 30 ppm, which is a level dramatically less than that of a banana!